Virginia, Maryland and Washington DC Real Estate Search

Portfolio Realty is a premier real estate firm serving Virginia, Maryland and Washington DC. The DC metro area real estate market demands high levels of skill, proficiency and knowledge. Whether you are eager to buy your first home, sell your nest egg, invest or relocate to the area, it is important to protect your investment by working with a local market expert.
City Min $
Zip Max $
Type Beds

Advanced Search

Baths
Refine Your Search
All Homes
Foreclosures/REO's
Short Sales
New Construction

Virginia Real Estate

Spectrum Condo in Falls Church, VA

A more eco-friendly condominium with the feel of city living.  Office and retail venues are just steps away from the Spectrum Condo.  Located in the heart of downtown Falls Church,  enjoy a show at the State Theater or take in the metro into Washington DC.  Between the East and West Falls Church Metro and GEORGE […]

Clarendon 1021 Condo in Arlington VA

Built in 2005 with 417 total residential units is one of the most popular condominiums in Arlington VA.  Clarendon 1021 condominium.   Mostly because of the location in the heart of Clarendon with less than 1 block away from the orange line metro.  This high rise condo has your typical high end finishes including hardwood floors, […]

Alexandria

Alexandria Virginia

Alexandria is an established city in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 128,283. Located along the Western bank of the Potomac River, Alexandria is approximately 6 miles (9.6 kilometers) south of downtown Washington, D.C.

Like the rest of Northern Virginia, as well as central Maryland, modern Alexandria has been shaped by its proximity to the nation’s capital. It is largely populated by professionals working in the federal civil service, the U.S. military, or for one of the many private companies which contract to provide services to the federal government. The latter are known locally as beltway bandits, after the Capital Beltway, an interstate highway that circles Washington, D.C. One of Alexandria’s largest employers is the U.S. Department of Defense. Others include the Institute for Defense Analyses and the Center for Naval Analyses. In 2005, the United States Patent and Trademark Office moved 7,100 employees from 18 separate buildings in nearby Crystal City into a new headquarters complex in the city.

Alexandria is home to numerous trade associations, charities, and non-profit organizations including the national headquarters of groups such as the Salvation Army. In 2005, Alexandria became one of the first cities of its size to offer free wireless Internet access to some of its residents and visitors.

The historic center of Alexandria is known as Old Town. With its concentration of high-end boutiques, fine restaurants, antique shops and theaters, it is a major draw for tourists and those seeking nightlife. Like Old Town, many Alexandria neighborhoods are compact, walkable, high-income suburbs of Washington D.C.

It is the seventh largest and highest income independent city in Virginia. A 2005 assessed-value study of homes and condominiums found that over 40 percent were in the highest bracket, worth $556,000 or more.
Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 15.4 square miles (39.9 km²), of which, 15.2 square miles (39.3 km²) of it is land and 0.2 square miles (0.6 km²) of it is water. The total area is 1.49% water. Alexandria is bounded on the east by the Potomac River, on the north and northwest by Arlington County, and on the south by Fairfax County. The western portions of the city were annexed from those two entities beginning in the 1930s.

The addressing system in Alexandria is not uniform and reflects the consolidation of several originally separate communities into a single city. In Old Town Alexandria, building numbers are assigned north and south from King Street and west (only) from the Potomac River. In the areas formerly in the Town of Potomac, such as Del Ray and St. Elmo, building numbers are assigned east and west from Commonwealth Avenue and north (only) from King Street. In the western parts of the city, building numbers are assigned north and south from Duke Street.

The ZIP code prefix 223 uniquely identifies the Alexandria postal area. However, the Alexandria postal area extends well into Fairfax County and includes more addresses outside of the city than inside of it. Delivery areas have ZIP codes 22301 through 22312, 22314, and 22315, with other ZIP codes in use for post office boxes and large mailers. ZIP codes are not assigned in any particular geographic order.
Demographics

As of the census of 2000, there were 128,283 people, 61,889 households, and 27,726 families residing in the city. The population density was 8,452.0 people per square mile (3,262.9/km²). There were 64,251 housing units at an average density of 4,233.2/sq mi (1,634.2/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 59.79% European American (White), 24.54% African American, 0.28% Native American, 5.65% Asian American, 0.09% Pacific Islander, 7.38% from other races, and 4.27% from two or more races. 14.72% of the population were Hispanics or Latinos of any race.

By 2005 58.3% of Alexandria’s population was non-Hispanic whites. 21.7% were African-Americans, 0.4% Native Americans, 5.3% Asian and 13.7% Latino.

In 2000 there were 61,889 households out of which 18.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 32.2% were married couples living together, 9.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 55.2% were non-families. 43.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.04 and the average family size was 2.87.

The age distribution was 16.8% under the age of 18, 9.2% from 18 to 24, 43.5% from 25 to 44, 21.5% from 45 to 64, and 9.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females there were 93.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.7 males.

According to a 2007 estimate, the median income for a household in the city was $77,797, and the median income for a family was $98,881.[25] Males had a median income of $47,514 versus $41,254 for females. The per capita income for the city was $37,645. 8.9% of the population and 6.8% of families were below the poverty line. 13.9% of those under the age of 18 and 9.0% of those 65 and older were living below the poverty line.
Education

The city is served by the Alexandria City Public Schools system and by the Alexandria campus of Northern Virginia Community College. The largest seminary in the Episcopal Church, Virginia Theological Seminary, is located on Seminary Road. Virginia Tech’s Alexandria Architecture Center, also known as WAAC, is located on Prince Street in Old Town, offering graduate programs in Urban Affairs and Planning, Public and International Affairs, Architecture, and Landscape Architecture. Virginia Commonwealth University operates a Northern Virginia branch of its School of Social Work in Alexandria. George Washington University (Washington DC) also has an Alexandria campus near the King Street metro. This campus mainly offers professional and vocational programs, such as an executive MBA program, urban planning and security studies.

Alexandria is home to several of the Washington D.C. area’s top private schools, such as St. Stephen’s and St. Agnes School, Episcopal High School, and Bishop Ireton High School. Also in the city are Alexandria Country Day School, Commonwealth Academy, St. Mary’s Catholic School, St. Rita’s Catholic School and Blessed Sacrament Learning Center. Students and faculty from the Thornton Friends School of Maryland, which closed its Virginia Campus in June 2006, have formed the new Alexandria Friends School to maintain Alexandria’s tradition of Quaker education.

Alexandria’s public school system consists of thirteen elementary schools for grades 5-year-old Kindergarten through Grade 5. Middle Schools, George Washington and Francis C. Hammond, serve 6th through 8th graders. Minnie Howard Ninth Grade Center and T.C. Williams High School serve grades 9th and 10 through 12, respectively, for the entire city.

T.C. Williams, and its legendary former head football coach, Herman Boone, former assistant coach Bill Yoast and the Virginia State Champion 1971 Titan football squad were featured in the 2000 Disney motion picture Remember the Titans starring Denzel Washington and Will Patton.

Affordability Calculator

Monthly Gross Income $
Monthly Debt Expenses [?] $
Down Payment: $
Interest Rate: %